Why do you get up and go to work Monday through Friday (and sometimes on weekends)? Sure, you need a salary to pay for a roof over your head, food on your table and clothes on your back. But beyond collecting a paycheck, what’s your purpose? And does this purpose align with the mission and values of your employer?

For many, they don’t know. In fact, a large number of employees are unhappy at work, disenchanted with the company’s mission and demotivated by lack of positive feedback from superiors, according to “The Greatness Gap: The State of Employee Disengagement” report from Achievers.

Having a sense of purpose ignites employees’ intrinsic motivation. But for workers today, the report indicates that the bigger picture isn’t resonating. In fact, 61% don’t know their company’s mission. And of those, 57% don’t find their company’s mission statement motivating. Furthermore, 60% don’t know their company’s vision. Ouch.

Clearly, the data suggest that the corporate mission and vision aren’t inspiring employees to come to work. So perhaps the cultural fit is more enticing? Nope. While 37% say they like their company’s culture, 61% don’t know their company’s cultural values.

Since employees seem to be clueless when it comes to the mission their company is on and the values it stands for, it’s no wonder there is a significant lack of employee loyalty. The survey also revealed that 50% of respondents expect to be working for a new employer in just one year.

Obviously, there is a HUGE disconnect, a divide, a crevasse even, with employees on one side and employers on the other. For organizations to be successful, they must build a bridge between the two and close the gap.

While organizational change is a far broader topic that this one article can address, what is clear is that there’s significant opportunity for better communication regarding company mission and vision to enhance the overall organizational culture. And some well-designed swag can help.

Take Post-it® Notes. These office staples can be quite effective at message delivery because they’re used so often. Use variable printing on the sheets to rotate through a number of the company’s core beliefs.

Padfolios are another option. Include a notepad that is imprinted with the company mission or values at the bottom of each page to get that important repetition of message.

If your company has 12 core beliefs, for example, create a calendar with beautiful images representing each value, one for each month. You could also support these 12 core beliefs with some kind of training or education each month. How to make it fun? Have a competition between departments to create “something” that depicts that particular core belief. Divide the staff into 12 teams, each team is given one of the core beliefs and they have to create some kind of interesting presentation for the monthly staff meeting.

Not sure where to start? Get inspiration from companies that are doing thing right. Look for media articles (like this Entrepreneur article) that showcase how these companies build their culture, incorporate it into their everyday tasks and get buy-in from employees. Look on social media to see how they publicly recognize employees. (And check out these 10 ways to use social media to recognize and engage workers to start your own program.)

Visit your favorite bookseller or peruse the shelves of your local library. Many corporate leaders and experts have written books about the subject. Look at Zappos, for example, that is renowned for its excellent corporate culture. In Delivering Happiness: A Path To Profits, Passion And Purpose, Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh shares the different lessons he has learned in business and life, and he shows how a very different kind of corporate culture is a powerful model for achieving success. And author Joseph Michelli goes beyond the playful, offbeat company culture Zappos has become famous for to reveal what occurs behind the scenes and show how employees at all levels operate on a day-today basis in The Zappos Experience: 5 Principles To Inspire, Engage And WOW.

With more and more transparency these days, the info is out there. Do the research and then take what you learn and adapt it to your specific culture and employee needs.

But keep in mind that there’s no hack to quickly improve corporate culture and employee engagement. It takes commitment and communication beginning at the top. And it takes time.

While swag isn’t going to solve these larger organizational problems, it can be used as a tool to reach out to employees and communicate about the company’s mission and values. And communication is the first step to cultivating engaged employees.

 

Inspired to get to work on your communication to improve employee engagement? We can help. Book an appointment by clicking here or call us now at 248-538-4700. Mention the blog, and we’ll send you some SMART Swag to get the conversation started!